Category: New Releases

The Peanut Butter Falcon: Two bandits on the run

Anyone can tell a story. How you tell it is often as important, if not more important, than the story itself. When we talk about feel-good stories – tales that warm your heart and ease your mind – there’s a tendency for certain storytellers to emotionally manipulate their audience with a piece of dialogue, burst of somber music or a plethora of other ways. … Read More The Peanut Butter Falcon: Two bandits on the run

American Factory: The price of globalization

There have been a number of exceptional documentaries released in 2019 covering a range of political, historical and pop culture topics. Perhaps none sits quite on the threshold of where the United States stands currently in an everchanging global economy than the latest Netflix release, “American Factory.” A top non-fiction film and award winner to come out of this year’s Sundance Film Festival, this … Read More American Factory: The price of globalization

Blinded By The Light: Connecting through good tunes

Pop culture can transcend all sorts of boundaries. People from different walks of life can identify with one another over a favorite sports team, the filmography of a terrific actor or director or a classic album by a prized musical artist. It’s this cultural bridge building that’s at the heart of director Gurinder Chadha’s latest feature, “Blinded By The Light,” inspired by the true … Read More Blinded By The Light: Connecting through good tunes

Good Boys: Super bad on a sixth grade reading level

Why is “South Park” an animated series? Couldn’t creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker have made their crude and frequently violent show about prepubescent boys a live action series just as easily, if not cheaper? The reason they don’t is simple: an animated overweight boy using expletives every other sentence while making sex jokes is funny because the animation separates the joke from reality. … Read More Good Boys: Super bad on a sixth grade reading level

The Souvenir: Love and other drugs

Joanna Hogg doesn’t make life easy on her audience. Subtlety and layers of hidden context abound in her latest feature, “The Souvenir,” a semi-autobiographical drama she wrote and directed about a young film student’s destructive love affair with an older man set in the 1980s. Audiences are shown bits of Julie and Anthony’s time together in a piecemeal, fragmented way that’s part slice of … Read More The Souvenir: Love and other drugs

Where’d You Go, Bernadette: Charmingly quirky

Film adaptations of popular novels are pretty commonplace. There’s an agreed upon story structure, character development and even dialogue to pull from source material for the screenplay. Films become the living embodiment of the images we get in our heads while reading. But what happens when you’re traditionally adapting untraditionally written storytelling? Such is the case with director Richard Linklater’s newest film, “Where’d You … Read More Where’d You Go, Bernadette: Charmingly quirky

The Farewell: The value of a good lie

Many of the best films are personal, whether they be exact recreations of past events in the lives of those making them or simple adaptations of real life. Writer/director Lulu Wang took a unique cultural moment from her own life for her second feature film, “The Farewell.” “Based on an actual lie” as the film’s title card states, “The Farewell” fictionalizes a pivotal moment … Read More The Farewell: The value of a good lie

Hobbs And Shaw: 2 Fast 2 Furious 2 Care

Remember that small dramatic action flick from 2001 about boosting cars? Seven movies later, it’s harder and harder to remember that “The Fast and the Furious” was about a Los Angeles cop going undercover to infiltrate a gang of automobile thieves. A prime victim of the money-hungry quest of studios to franchise everything, a small crime drama has become an international box office sensation … Read More Hobbs And Shaw: 2 Fast 2 Furious 2 Care

Once Upon A Time In Hollywood: Tinseltown fantasy

“Once Upon A Time In Hollywood” is everything one might come to expect from a Quentin Tarantino film and yet somehow, it’s also nothing like what one might expect from Quentin Tarantino. Reflective of a man who grew up in the movies engrossed in every aspect of filmmaking, Tarantino’s ninth feature ramps up the dialogue and nonlinear storytelling while tempering down his trademark rampages … Read More Once Upon A Time In Hollywood: Tinseltown fantasy

The Lion King: A joyless wonder

Looks aren’t everything. Disney’s latest remake of an animated classic delivers a visually impressive cinematic experience that fails to hold muster over the course of two hours. Released 25 years after the two-time Oscar winning original in 1994, “The Lion King” swaps hand drawn cartoon animation for near perfect, photo realistic computer graphics. In so doing, Disney and director Jon Favreau have excised the … Read More The Lion King: A joyless wonder

Be Natural: Uncovering a film legend

Before there was Charlie Chaplin, there was Alice Guy-Blaché. Odds are, if you know even just a cursory amount of movie history, the silent film star is one of the first people rattled off the top of the list. The industry’s first female filmmaker – involved in almost 1,000 films as some combination of director, writer and producer – rarely comes to mind, if … Read More Be Natural: Uncovering a film legend

Stuber: Not a five-star ride

Kumail Nanjiani, writer and star of the 2017 breakout hit “The Big Sick,” is an extremely funny man. Dave Bautista, former World Wrestling Entertainment performer and “Guardians of the Galaxy” co-star, is following in the footsteps of wrestlers past like Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and John Cena and can be a very funny man in his own right. Their first collaboration, a buddy comedy … Read More Stuber: Not a five-star ride